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Category: Development EN

Pedestrians have rights too

As you are walking along the pedestrian five-foot-ways, your way is suddenly obstructed forcing you to sidestep onto a busy road, with speeding vehicles. For many, obstructions along these five-foot-ways have become a normal sight and are often ignored. But these very same obstructions could involve you and your family in terrible road accidents. In fact, without you realising it, your right as a...
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When caretakers become abusers

CAP is disturbed to note the abuse of individuals at the Taman Sinar Harapan home – a government-run shelter - in Kuala Kubu Baru. Just as appalling to learn is that children at the home are apparently fed cough mixture, which causes drowsiness, to keep them in a docile state. It is shocking that abuse of such magnitude can take place in a government centre, where care of the disadvantaged by...
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How to solve massive jams on Penang Bridge

Consumers Association of Penang (CAP) is extremely disappointed at the negligence which caused the traffic chaos at the Penang Bridge in February this year. The accident which involved a crane tipping over while lifting a demolished retaining wall on the bridge caused a massive traffic jam with thousands of motorists being stranded in their vehicles for up to eight hours. The accident caused one...
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housing-problems

A credible Housing Policy is long overdue

Having decent shelter, adequate food, good health care and education are basic human rights of our citizens. The government has a moral responsibility to ensure that majority of its citizens can either own their house or afford to rent public housing. Sadly for the citizens the government is not taking the problem seriously or is going about it the wrong way. For if it was genuine in making...
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Rethink on export-led growth paradigm

The slowdown in the US economy has heightened the urgency for developing and emerging economies to change their growth strategies. By Kanaga Raja The developing and emerging-market economies that have focussed their current export-oriented strategies on the markets of the major developed economies for achieving growth and job creation should rethink their policies, the United Nations Conference...
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What is trade justice?

The right to choose trade policies Poor people have the right to benefit from trade. Poor countries must be able to choose economic policies, including trade policies that work to reduce poverty. They need the freedom to help support and protect their vulnerable enterprises and traders in the most appropriate way. These policies should not be based on the `advice' of the rich. They should be...
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What’s wrong with trade?

We live in a world of outrageous inequality, with millions of people trapped in poverty. More than anything else it is the institutions, conditions, rules and practices of international trade that keep poor people poor. It is now more important than ever that this situation be transformed. The facts and arguments below will show you the ill effects of trade to those in the developing countries....
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Utilitarian Free Trade killed millions in China and India

According to a briefing paper by a UK advocacy group, nearly 50 million people in India and China died at the end of the 19th century as a result of these countries being forcibly incorporated into the economic and political structures of the modern world system of that era. By Chakravarthi Raghavan GENEVA: The famines and deaths of 50 million people in India and China at the end of the 19th...
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The sorry state of Orang Asli health

The recent disclosures made by Dr. Selva Vathany Pillai concerning malpractice and the misappropriation of resources by hospital authorities at the Gombak Hospital, brings into stark focus, the social and health status of this community. The Orang Asli, (aboriginal peoples), who are the most marginalised community in the country continue to suffer the loss of their lands through resettlement,...
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Development is a form of theft

Conventional development, under which the rich take from Third World people most of the value produced by their labour, land and capital, is a subtle and little-recognised form of theft. By Ted Trainer There are two quite different ways of conceiving development. The conventional approach tells poor Third World people to increase their exports, because then they will earn more money and be able...
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